#m25movers #guide1

Moving with pets

We know moving is stressful, but imagine what it’s like being a pet who has no idea what’s going on around them. Moving home can have the same effect on your pets as it does on you. Dogs and cats can get extremely stressed out because of the unexpected goings-on in their home, not to mention being introduced to new surroundings.

It’s never easy moving with pets, so here are some tips on making the experience less fraught.

  • Pre - Move day
  • Moving day
  • Others
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Contact your Vet

If you’re planning to move out of the area, talk to your vet about getting any medical records they may have for your pets. Should your pets need medication to ensure you have enough to cover the time of the move and until you are settled. When moving to a new neighbourhood, your vet may be able to recommend another vet to take on the care of your pets.

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Prepare a going away bag

Think of it just like your overnight bag when you take a short break. All the essentials your pet will need for two or three days until the unpacking is finished. You’ll need things like dog food, kitty litter, grooming tools, and favourite toys, so they have something recognisable in their new surroundings.

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Pets away on moving day

When moving day comes around, it’s best to try and reduce your pet’s stress as much as possible. Try and keep them in the quietest areas. You may want to consider putting them in a kennel for the day or leaving them with a friend. Whatever you decide, give them a break, and get them away from the hurly-burly of the move.

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Be your pet’s chauffeur

Use your vehicle to take your pet to the new house. If you’re used to travelling with cats and small dogs, you’ve probably already got a carrier that can be secured in the back seat with a seatbelt. However, depending on their temperament, bigger dogs may need a kennel in the back of the car.
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Don't let 'em out

Try not to let your pet out of the vehicle until you’ve arrived at your destination. If they need to get out for a comfort break, make sure the animal is on a leash. Once you get to your new home it often feels it’s good to let the pet out so it can explore, which is the wrong thing to do. When they arrive in a new neighbourhood, they will be disorientated and can easily get lost. It’s best to take your dog or cat straight into their new home so they can become acclimated to their new surroundings before letting them roam.
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Keep your pet secluded!

Try and get much of your new home sorted before introducing your dog or cat. If you have one room set up, confine them to that area so they can slowly adjust to their new location. It’s a great idea to give them lots of attention and make sure they have their favourite toys and blankets so they can recognise something homely. Update their info! If your cat or dog wears an identity tag or has a microchip, don’t forget to update the information with details of their new address and phone number.
MOVING WITH PETS

A Fishy Tale

Not everyone has a cat or a dog as a pet. If you keep tropical fish moving them needs careful planning. You may be surprised to learn that fish respond to stress, and relocation can be traumatising to them and may prove fatal. So experts recommend only transporting fish short distances in special transport containers filled with their old tank water.
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Moving guinea pigs!

Just moving guinea pigs can be fatal. The small animals’ hearts are particularly sensitive, and they don’t like change or being jostled. So, if you are moving guinea pigs make sure they are transported in a small carrier that is comfortable and warm.
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Don't let them fly away

The last thing you want is for the birds to fly away! Like all animals, birds are just as jittery about moving. Keep your birds caged at all times during the move, as you don’t want them to fly the coop.

#m25movers #ready #reserve

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